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Monday, September 10, 2012

Post Civil Services Retirement Sinecures and Corruption in India

FROM MY DEAR FRIEND AMBASSADOR GAJENDRA SINGH

http://tarafits.blogspot.in/2012/09/post-civil-services-retirement.html 
Post Retirement Sinecures and Corruption
 
As I had studied the Indian Constitution a bit , having gone to CAT in 1986, after retirement in 1996 I had written to some batch mates that it may be worthwhile to file a petition in the Supreme Court that posts after retirement, such as in CAT, UPSC, Appellate authorities should be like for CVC ,Election Commission transparent and open to all qualified serving or retired IAS and IPS and other civil service officers as guaranteed in the Constitution and not left to the whims of the ruling governments of India or the states . There was no response .I may be uncharitable but some of them might have thought that they hoped for some assignments themselves and did not want to muddy their chances. Many of them did get some such post retirement jobs 'on merit'
 
As we have seen over the years with the political class getting more and more corrupted and degenerate it has badly affected the working of civil services. If not already at 50, civil servants belonging to IAS, IPS and IRS start looking for patrons i.e. ministers and MPs and even MLAs to arrange for employment after retirement .The political class of ministers and members of Parliament have since decades looked for pliable officers and have made them take many irregular decisions even before retirement. Such pliable and corrupt officers are then recommended and appointed to post retirement jobs .This has been exposed through the miasma of corruption which has cast a dark shadow over the fairness of the governance.
 
Recently the Indian Express investigated into how many civil servants managed to get sinecure jobs after retirement .It is given below and speaks for it. Many of us were beneficiary of the system although some of them might claim that it was based on their merit. The only thing achieved by merit however subjective it might be was UPSC selection into civil services. After that caste community religion all these matters come into play and have played havoc with Administration in this country. In the Ottoman and earlier empires, even when the rulers had lost their qualities of leadership, the bureaucrats, say the grand Viziers in the Ottoman Empire, which lasted for over 500 years ,were able to steer the wheel of the state based on merit and loyalty to the state. Does Indian bureaucracy show loyalty to the state and not to caste, religion, region and language etc?
 
Unfortunately the system provides no protection to honest civil service officers or even whistle blowers. Those especially in IAS and IPS can be transferred on the spur of the moment. How long can you fight. There have been some very commendable cases but most of them as a Supreme Court judge recently advised Gen VK Singh court to blow with the wind did so. The list below is of those who blew with the wind and have done well for themselves but not for the country or the system itself.

Alas very few such opportunities for IFS , so unlike 1950s and 60s ,IFS is no longer the most sought after servic.

Mera Bharat Mahan 


Former, not ex: How retd babus never retire

Shyamlal Yadav : New Delhi, Mon Jul 09 2012,
 
It may have started as a rare measure to utilise the talent or domain expertise of a veteran bureaucrat after his or her official tenure. But what began as an exception to the norm seems to have morphed into almost a new cadre — that of officers as lifetime civil servants.
The range of sinecures available to them include some they may have coveted or worked towards while in service, while others they get as rewards for their service to the establishment. Some among them hop from one post-retirement pasture to another until age runs out on them or there is a change in the party or alliance in power.
Information accessed by The Indian Express, including through the RTI Act, shows a disproportionately large number of retired IAS and IPS officers, and to a smaller extent those retired from services such as revenue, foreign, postal and audits and accounts, appointed to government and quasi-government bodies.
Details of nearly 90 such appointments made in recent years show these civil servants being parked as governors, information commissioners, and as heads or members of a slew of bodies such as the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC), the National Commission for Minorities (NCM), Central Information Commission, National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission and the Central Administrative Tribunal (CAT). Most of these posts enjoy the rank of secretary to the government of India or above. In case of some officers, new positions have been created to accommodate them.
Such as T K A Nair, who had a long stint in the Prime Minister's Office as principal secretary to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. The retired, 1963-batch Punjab-cadre IAS officer was named as Adviser in the PMO, a post which did not exist. He has the rank and status of a minister of state and holds office until further orders. On the other side of the high walls that separate the PMO and Rashtrapati Bhavan, Christy Fernandez, secretary to outgoing president Pratibha Patil, is a retired 1973-batch Gujarat-cadre IAS officer.
IAS and IPS officers seem to be in high demand for the job of governors. Of the 27 governors and three lieutenant governors in the country, seven are former IPS officers and four former IAS officers. The IAS-officers-turned-governors include N N Vohra (Jammu and Kashmir), who retired in 1994; Balmiki Prasad Singh (Sikkim), who retired in 2002; and Shekhar Dutta (Chhattisgarh), who retired in 2009. Tejinder Khanna, who retired in 1996, is the lieutenant governor of Delhi.
Their IPS counterparts include M K Narayanan (West Bengal), who retired way back in 1992 and was also national security adviser; B L Joshi (Uttar Pradesh), who quit the IPS to join an NGO in 1991; and Gurbachan Jagat (Manipur), a Punjab-cadre officer who served as chief of the Jammu and Kashmir Police and the Border Security Force before retiring in 2002.
Before being appointed governor, Jagat was also the chairman of the UPSC. Joshi, considered close to the Nehru-Gandhi family, was the lieutenant governor of Delhi and the governor of Uttarakhand before being moved to the more crucial state of Uttar Pradesh.
In fact, seven of the UPSC's nine members are former bureaucrats. They include former UP chief secretary P K Mishra, former defence secretary Vijay Singh, former Department of Personnel and Training secretary Alka Sirohi and former Haryana-cadre IAS officer Rajni Razdan. The other three are a former IFS officer, an ex-IPS officer and an ex-postal service officer.
The move to make the government transparent through the Right To Information Act has also opened up new avenues for these retired bureaucrats, as chief information commissioners and information commissioners at the Centre and states. The RTI Act says, "The Chief Information Commissioner and Information Commissioners shall be persons of eminence in public life with wide knowledge and experience in law, science and technology, social service, management, journalism, mass media or administration and governance."
Seven of the nine members of the CIC, including its chief, are former bureaucrats, in what seems an unusual stress on the "administration and governance" criterion of the selection. In fact, of the 29 chief information commissioners in the country, including the one at the Centre, 22 are former IAS officers. And of the 54 information commissioners, 29 are former civil servants, including 16 with an IAS background.
Former bureaucrats have made their way into even bodies such as the NCM, which traditionally had representatives from a cross section of communities. The commission is now headed by Wajahat Habibullah, a former IAS officer who was also the country's first chief information commissioner. Its vice-chairman H T Sangliana is a well-known IPS officer from Karnataka who went on to contest elections after his retirement and represented the BJP in the Lok Sabha. One of the three members of the commission is K N Daruwala, a retired 1958-batch IPS officer.
Similarly, the heads of the SC and ST commissions, P L Punia and Rameshwar Oraon, had served as IAS and IPS officers respectively, before joining politics. The NHRC has as its members former IFS officer Satyabrata Pal and former IPS officer P C Sharma. A former CBI director, Sharma is serving his second term in the NHRC.
CAT has traditionally been populated by former IAS officers and of the six Member (Administrative) posts in Delhi, four are occupied by them. CAT has 17 benches across the country, including its principal bench in Delhi, and of the 34 Members (Administrative), 25 retired from the IAS.
Of the 28 members at the National Manufacturing Competitive Council, which includes serving bureaucrats as well, is Ajay Shankar, who retired from the IAS in 2009 and happens to be the husband of former Indian ambassador to the US Meera Shankar. Similarly, two of the nine members of the National Disaster Management Authority, which is headed by the prime minister, are former IAS officers: former food secretary T Nand Kumar and former home secretary V K Duggal.
The chairman of the Competition Commission of India, Ashok Chawla, and three of the six other members are former IAS officers. While the chairman is paid a consolidated salary of Rs 3.75 lakh a month, the members get Rs 3.12 lakh. Again, five of the eight members of the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission are retired IAS officers.
Retired IAS officer Sanjeev Mishra has been appointed to the Finance Commission while the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission has Pramod Deo and M Deena Dayalam. Another retired IAS officer, J Hariharan, has been appointed to the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority. And last month, the National Highways Authority of India got a chairman after remaining without a full-time head for 17 months: Rajinder Pal Singh, a retired, Madhya Pradesh-cadre IAS officer.
 
Below is a list of 24 IAS officers investigated for corruption during a period of 15 months only .This is only a tip of the iceberg. No state / kingdom can survive without good admn .Can babus be honest and survive now a days .Almost impossible. They will have to make a choice using GV 's cute phrase. Still Ramki suffered and left IAS. Bando survived as a few others and remained upright.
 
In some ways we from 1961 batch were lucky as corruption was not so rampant among political class who can now even transfer any officer on the spot .The situation became difficult from mid 1980s .I felt the pressure of politicians and MPs while CMD IDPL , but it was tolerable .But once my support VC Tripathy passed away , I had to leave .
 
When I joined loss making IDPL ,TOI in frontpage piece had forecast a loss of $ 35 to 40 million .I kept it to 25 as previous year .After I had left it jumped to 50 million .Any appreciation or reward .Have a heart ,The then FS Venketasaran even tried to stop me joining MEA.He now pontificates on IFS google group . I have contempt for many FS's in MEA. But they are part of our corrupt society and system , what if they are in pinstripes .
 
Is there any hope .None for the time being .Even Anna has been tired out . Churchill must be laughing in his grave .
 
Churchill had this to say during the debate in British Parliament on the grant of independence to India in 1947. "Liberty is man's birth right. However to give the reins of government to Congress at the juncture, is to hand over the destiny of hungry millions into the hands of rascals, rogues and freebooters. Not a bottle of water or a loaf of bread shall escape taxation; only the air will be free and the blood of these hungry millions will be on the head of Mr. Atlee. India will be lost in political squabbles...It will take a thousand years for them to enter the periphery of philosophy or politics. Today, we hand over the reins of government to men of straw of whom no trace will be found after a few years."
 

CBI probes a record number of babus

Rahul Tripathi : New Delhi, Mon Aug 27 2012, Ind Express
 
A record number of IAS officers, 24, have been investigated by the CBI in corruption cases between January 2011 and March this year. They came under the agency's scanner for their alleged role in land scams, disproportionate assets cases and for taking policy decisions that favoured private parties, according to information available with the CBI.
The alleged role of many of these bureaucrats came to light through responses to RTI queries. CBI officials said the agency had secured sanction for prosecuting many of these officers under Section 19 A of the Prevention of Corruption Act and would soon file chargesheets. It is mandatory for the CBI to get the approval of the Department of Personnel and Training to prosecute officials.
Some of the high-profile bureaucrats under investigation:
JAIRAJ PHATAK: The 1978-batch, Maharashtra-cadre officer is accused in the Adarsh Housing Society scam. Phatak had served as principal secretary in the state urban development department. He is accused of allowing the height of the building in Mumbai to be raised beyond 100m without the approval of the high-rise committee of the civic body. His son got a flat in Adarsh, allegedly as quid pro quo.
PRADEEP VYAS: A co-accused in the Adarsh scam, Vyas was arrested by the CBI recently. A 1989-batch IAS officer of the Maharashtra cadre, Vyas, during his tenure as district collector of Mumbai from August 2002 to May 2005, allegedly connived with the other accused and accepted false documents as proof of of income and granted membership to Adarsh to those not eligible. His wife Seema Vyas, also an IAS officer, owns a flat in Adarsh.
K SURESH KUMAR: A 1982-batch, Madhya Pradesh-cadre IAS officer, Kumar has been booked for allegedly allowing the berthing of a foreign vessel in violation of rules in 2007. The ship allegedly had neither valid papers nor crew on board. By allowing it to dock and not collecting payments, including additional berth hire charges, demurrage and legal expenses, a loss of over Rs 20 crore was allegedly caused to the government. The CBI seized Rs 2.36 crore during raids on Kumar's home.
B V SELVARAJ: A 1981-batch, UT-cadre IAS officer, Selvaraj allegedly took a bribe from a contractor promising him government contracts when he was posted as administrator in Lakshadweep.
ABRAHUM VARICKAMACKAL: A 1998-batch UT-cadre IAS officer, Varickamackal allegedly abused his official position between 2006 and 2009 and entered into a conspiracy with a government contractor named Kassim. The CBI has alleged that Varickamackal without authorisation awarded contracts to Kassim for supply of river sand and granite chips from the mainland to the islands of Lakshadweep, and that he was was later joined in the conspiracy by his senior, Selvaraj.
B P ACHARYA: A 1983-batch IAS officer, Acharya was charged in a case of corruption related to industrial infrastructure in Hyderabad. Acharya was arrested in January this yea, when he was the home secretary of Andhra Pradesh. He was previously the managing director of APIIC.
L V SUBRAMANYAM: Another 1983-batch IAS officer from Andhra Pradesh, Subramanyam was facing charges of corruption in the Emmar-MGF scam. He and his batchmate Acharya have been accused of bungling in a properties scam involving former Andhra Pradesh chief minister Y S R Reddy.
Y SRILAXMI: A 1988-batch IAS officer from Andhra Pradesh, Srilaxmi has been accused of showing preferential treatment to the owner of Obulapuram Mining Company. Srilakshmi was Andhra Pradesh's secretary for industries.
O RAVI: A 1983-batch IAS officer, Ravi was arrested by the CBI for allegedly demanding a bribe of Rs 25 lakh from Daman and Diu-based distilleries. The CBI had alleged that favours shown to the distilleries resulted in a loss of Rs 340 crore to the exchequer. Ravi was posted as joint secretary in the Union Home Ministry before his arrest.
SADA KANT: A 1983-batch IAS officer from Uttar Pradesh, Kant was under the scanner for his alleged role in the award of a contract involving a high-altitude road in Leh. He was repatriated to his parent cadre by the Home Ministry where he was posted as joint secretary, border management.
MANOJ KUMAR AGGARWAL: A 1990-batch West Bengal-cadre IAS officer, Aggarwal was under the scanner of the CBI for allegedly amassing wealth beyond his known source of income.
PARIMAL RAI: The high profile senior bureaucrat is being probed for his alleged role in the CWG scam. A 1985-batch IAS officer, Rai was the chairman of NDMC at the time of the CWG. He was booked by the CBI in connection with alleged irregularities in the construction of a convention centre, which resulted in a loss of Rs 15 crore.
RAKESH MOHAN: A 1978-batch IAS officer, Mohan, during his stint as Delhi government's financial commissioner, allegedly took a bribe of Rs 3 crore from a private company for awarding a contract for the renovation of Delhi Jal Board's pipelines at an over-valued cost of Rs 35.84 crore.
VINOD KUMAR: A 1989-batch IAS officer, Kumar is named in seven cases in the Orissa Rural Housing Development Corporation which involve a total of Rs 475 crore.
PRADEEP SHUKLA: A 1981-batch IAS officer, Shukla is accused in Uttar Pradesh's National Rural Health Mission scam. The topper of his batch, Shukla has held several important portfolios in UP. His wife Anuradha Shukla is also an IAS officer and is posted in UP.
K DHANALAKSHMI GOWDA: A 2000-batch IAS officer, Gowda's name was linked to the UPSIDC land scam. The house of the IAS officer from Uttar Pradesh was raided by the CBI on suspicion that she had amassed more wealth than her known sources of income.
SIDDHARTHA BEHURA: Behura was arrested by the CBI in the 2G scam along with former telecom minister A Raja. A 1973-batch, UP cadre IAS officer, Behura is alleged to be one of the key conspirators in the 2G scam. Behura had retired by the time of his arrest. He has been chargesheeted by the CBI along with Raja and others.
Dr PRADEEP KUMAR: A former health secretary of Jharkhand, Kumar was on the run for several months after being named by the CBI in an NRHM scam. A 1991-batch IAS officer, he has been accused of being involved in the scam worth Rs 130 crore, taking a bribe of Rs 4.85 lakh in a logistics scandal and acquiring disproportionate assets.
DEBADITYA CHAKRABORTY: A 1976-batch IAS officer of the West Bengal cadre, Chakraborty was arrested for his alleged involvement in a Rs 125 crore scam in Kolkata. He was accused of misappropriating funds in an iron ore export deal involving a Chinese firm.
R M JAMIR: A 1977-batch IAS officer of the West Bengal cadre, Jamir is allegedly involved in the same case as Chakraborty.

SHIV SHANKAR SHARMA: A 1981-batch IAS officer from Bihar, Sharma is being probed in a disproportionate assets case.

A confirmed gravy train ticket called 'Secretary (Personnel)'

 
Amitav Ranjan : New Delhi, Wed Jul 11 2012
 
While not all senior bureaucrats can be sure of a post-retirement position, those retiring as secretary in the Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions are a glaring exception.
Ten of the 11 officers who have served as secretaries (personnel) since the end of 1998 were accommodated with a position in the establishment just ahead of or immediately after superannuation. The eleventh is believed to have missed out only because of a controversy he apparently could not tackle adequately.
Although not a high-profile posting in terms of its visibility, the secretary (personnel) is extremely powerful as the office literally functions like the human resource arm of the government. It is responsible for appointments of bureaucrats, clearance of their vigilance files, and transfers and sanctions for prosecution among other things. The ministry also has administrative control over the CBI.
The trend goes back to December 1998 when Brij Bihari Tandon took over as secretary from Arvind Varma. After he relinquished charge on June 13, 2001, Tandon, a 1966-batch officer of Himachal Pradesh cadre, was appointed election commissioner and went on to become the chief election commissioner. During his tenure as EC, he was also made a member of the Delimitation Commission in July 2002.
* His successor Ajay Kumar Agarwal, a Madhya Pradesh-cadre, 1966-batch officer, was appointed member of the Public Enterprises Selection Board (PESB) just two months after his superannuation in November 2002, and vice-chairman of the Central Administrative Tribunal, Mumbai bench, in November 2003.
* S S Dawra, a 1967-batch, Punjab-cadre officer, succeeded Agarwal and retired in October 2003. Although he was tipped to become a member of the PESB, the change of guard at the Centre in the summer of 2004 apparently ruined his chances. But he went on to become chairman of the Punjab Revenue Commission and a director at Food Corporation of India.
* Dawra's successor Arun Bhatnagar, another 1966-batch officer from Madhya Pradesh cadre, had better luck under UPA I. Bhatnagar, who served a mere eight months as secretary in the ministry, was appointed secretary to the National Advisory Council, after the cabinet adopted the Common Minimum Programme and decided to set up the council.
Headed by UPA chairperson Sonia Gandhi, it became inactive when the office of profit controversy forced Gandhi to resign. When the NAC was wound up in 2008 — it was later reconstituted in 2010 — Bhatnagar was shifted to Prasar Bharati as its chairman in May 2008, replacing M V Kamath. Kamath, who had been appointed by the NDA government, still had a year's term left.
* A N Tiwari, a 1969-batch, Andhra Pradesh-cadre officer, replaced Bhatnagar as secretary (personnel). He opted for voluntary retirement on December 26, 2005, five days before his superannuation, only to join as information commissioner on December 28, 2005.
* The next bureaucrat in the post, Pratyush Sinha, a 1969-batch officer from the Bihar cadre, served a mere seven months and was made the Central Vigilance Commissioner on retirement.
* Lalit Kumar Joshi, a 1970-batch, Madhya Pradesh-cadre officer, took over from Sinha, but only for six months. He retired in January 2007 and within a month was made vice-chairman of the Central Administrative Tribunal, Delhi bench.
* Joshi's successor was another Madhya Pradesh-cadre officer of the 1973 batch, Satyananda Mishra. He did not wait for his superannuation and resigned on September 12, 2008, to join as information commissioner. In the process, he became information commissioner ahead of two others who were being appointed as commissioners — M L Sharma and Annapurna Dixit — retained seniority and went on to become the chief information commissioner.
* A 1974-batch, Jharkhand-cadre officer, Rahul Sarin, succeeded Mishra. He retired in August 2009 and was thought to be in the running for the post of election commissioner. However, he had to make do with the post of member in the Appellate Tribunal of the Competition Commission of India.
* The tradition of the secretary (personnel) getting a comfortable post-retirement government position was broken by Shantanu Consul, a 1974-batch, Karnataka-cadre officer. Consul was appointed as a member of the high-level Shunglu committee to look into the organisation and conduct of Commonwealth Games 2010. When the Shunglu report alleged irregularities in the organisation of the games, Consul reportedly ruined his chances of a sinecure.
* Consul was succeeded by his batchmate from the Madhya Pradesh cadre, Alka Sirohi. About a month before her retirement in January 2012, she was appointed a member of the Union Public Service Commission. Sirohi had a month to go before her retirement in January 2012 but her UPSC appointment order came on January 3, a day before her 60th birthday. She joined the UPSC the next day, ensuring she would get a full tenure there and hopefully make it to the post of chairperson.
(Concluded)
 

Executive-legislature separation fails as retired babus head LS, RS secretariats

Shyamlal Yadav : New Delhi, Thu Jul 12 2012
 
The Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha have separate services of officers who are responsible for the administration and functioning of the two houses of Parliament. This exclusive service, called the Parliament Secretariat Service, was considered necessary by the founding fathers of the constitution to separate the legislature from the other arms of the state and preserve its independence.
However, over the years, the top jobs in these services — called the secretary-general — have been cornered by retired IAS officers, particularly in the Rajya Sabha, causing disaffection among parliament secretariat service officers who would otherwise have risen to head their cadre. While the current and the previous two secretaries-general of the Rajya Sabha are retired IAS officers, the incumbent secretary-general of the Lok Sabha is an Indian Legal Service officer.
Government sources said that there are no clear rules governing these appointments which are made on contracts and the contract of incumbent secretary-general of the Rajya Sabha, VK Agnihotri, a retired Andhra Pradesh cadre IAS officer, is being renewed every year. In fact, the term of the secretary-general of the Rajya Sabha has become co-terminus with that of the presiding officer of the house, who is the Vice-President, in the case of the three retired IAS officers who have held this post.
More than the qualification for the job, sources say that the retired IAS officer's rapport with the presiding officer of the house which leads to the appointment of the secretary-general. The secretary-general enjoys the rank, perks and allowances of the cabinet secretary. While the secretary-general from within the parliament secretariat service has to retire at 62 as in the case of the cabinet secretary, there is no such age limit for retired IAS officers appointed on contract.
Agnihotri, who will be 67 next month, member (administrative) at the principal bench of the Central Administrative Tribunal before being appointed to head the Rajya Sabha service in October 2007.
His predecessor, Yogendra Narain, an IAS officer from the Uttar Pradesh cadre, was defence secretary before he retired and was appointed as Rajya Sabha secretary-general in 2002. Narain's predecessor was also another retired, UP cadre IAS officer, RC Tripathi. He was named to the job in 1997.
The tradition of bureaucrats moving to the Rajya Sabha secretariat service was started in 1993 with the appointment of VS Ramadevi, a retired Indian Legal Service officer. Like Ramadevi, the current Lok Sabha secretary-general, TK Vishwanathan, is also a retired Indian Legal Service officer. He was appointed in August 2010 and turns 64 in October. S. Gopalan is the only retired IAS officer who has been secretary-general of the Lok Sabha. The retired Kerala cadre officer served for three years from 1996.
Last year, a Lok Sabha Secretariat official, NK Sapra, challenged the decision to appoint Vishwanathan on contract but the Supreme Court turned down his appeal.
Retired bureaucrats as Rajya Sabha Secretary-General
VK Agnihotri, IAS Andhra Pradesh: since October 2007
Yogendra Narain, IAS Uttar Pradesh: Sept 2002 to Sept 2007
RC Tripathi, IAS, Uttar Pradesh: October 1997 to August 2002
VS Ramadevi, Indian Legal Service: July 1993 to July 1997
Retired Bureaucrats as Lok sabha Secretary-General
T K Vishwanathan, Indian Legal Service: Since August 2010
S Gopalan, IAS Kerala: July 1996 to July 1999
 
 
Served still serving
Part 1
S U Tripathi
Retired from: IFS
Became: Member, UPSC
P K Mishra
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member, UPSC
Vijay Singh
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Member, UPSC
Alka Sirohi
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Member, UPSC
Rajni Razdan
Retired from: IAS, Haryana
Became: Member, UPSC
K K Paul
Retired from: IPS, UT
Became: Member, UPSC
I M G Khan
Retired from: IPoS
Became: Member, UPSC
B K Chaturvedi
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member, Planning Commission
Wajahat Habibullah
Retired from: IAS, J&K
Became: Chairman, National Commission for Minorities
H T Sangliana
Retired from: IPS,
Karnataka
Became: Vice Chairman,
National Commission for
Minorities
K N Daruwala
Retired from: IPS
Became: Member, National Commission for Minorities
M K Narayanan
Retired from: IPS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Governor, West Bengal
E S L Narasimhan
Retired from: IPS, Andhra Pradesh
Became: Governor, Andhra Pradesh
Shekhar Dutta
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Governor,
Chhattisgarh
B V Wanchoo
Retired from: IPS, West
Bengal
Became: Governor, Goa
N N Vohra
Retired from: IAS, Punjab
Became: Governor, Jammu and Kashmir
Gurbachan Jagat
Retired from: IPS, Punjab
Became: Governor, Manipur
R S Mooshahary
Retired from: IPS, Kerala
Became: Governor,
Meghalaya
Nikhil Kumar
Retired from: IPS, UT
Became: Governor,
Nagaland
Balmiki Prasad Singh
Retired from: IAS,
Assam-Meghalaya
Became: Governor, Sikkim
B L Joshi
Retired from: IPS, Rajasthan
Became: Governor, Uttar Pradesh
tejendra Khanna
Retired from: IAS, Punjab
Became: Lt Governor, Delhi
Satyanand Mishra
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Chief Information Commissioner, CIC
Vijay Sharma
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Information
Commissioner, CIC
Rajiv Mathur
Retired from: IPS, UP
Became: Information
Commissioner, CIC
M L Sharma
Retired from: IPS, Rajasthan
Became: Information
Commissioner, CIC
Deepak Sandhu
Retired from: IIS
Became: Information
Commissioner, CIC
Sushma Singh
Retired from: IAS, Jharkhand
Became: Information
Commissioner, CIC
T Nand Kumar
Retired from: IAS, Jharkhand
Became: Member, NDMA
Jyoti K Sinha
Retired from: IPS, Bihar
Became: Member, NDMA
K M Singh
Retired from: IPS,
Maharashtra
Became: Member, NDMA
Pramod Deo
Retired from: IAS
Became: Chairman, Central Electricity Regulatory
Commission
M Deena Dayalam
Retired from: IAAS
Became: Member, Central Electricity Regulatory
Commission
Lakshmi Chand
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member, National Commission for Denotified, Nomadic and Semi-nomadic Tribes
Dr Anupam Dasgupta
Retired from: IAS,
Maharashtra
Became: Member, National Consumer Disputes
Reddressal Commission
S K Naik
Retired from: IAS, Punjab
Became: Member, National Consumer Disputes
Redressal Commission
Vineeta Rai
Retired from: IAS, UT
Became: Member, National Consumer Disputes
Redressal Commission
Vinay Kumar
Retired from: IAS,
Karnataka
Became: Member, National Consumer Disputes
Redressal Commission
Suresh Chandra
Retired from: IAS,
Maharashtra
Became: Member, National Consumer Disputes
Redressal Commission
P L Punia
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Chairman, National Commission for SC
Rameshwar Oraon
Retired from: IPS, Jharkhand
Became: Chairman, National Commission for ST
S S N Murthy
Retired from: IRS
Became: Member, Securities Appellate Tribunal
P K Malhotra
Retired from: ILS
Became: Member, Securities Appellate Tribunal
S Krishnan
Retired from: IAS,
Uttarakhand
Became: Chairman, Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board
Yashwant S Bhave
Retired from: IAS,
Maharashtra
Became: Chairman, Airports Economic Regulatory
Authority
Prakash Chand
ChhotAray
Retired from: IRS
Became: Member, SEBI
P K Ghosh
Retired from: IAS, Gujarat
Became: Member, Advisory Committee on SEBI Investors' Protection and Education
Rani Jadhao
Retired from: IAS,
Maharashtra
Became: Chairman, Tariff Authority on Major Ports
Pradeep Kumar
Retired from: IAS, Haryana
Became: Chief Vigilance Commissioner, CVC
R Srikumar
Retired from: IPS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Vigilance
Commissioner, CVC
J Hari Narayan
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Chairman, Insurance Regulatory and
Development Authority
Satyabrata Pal
Retired from: IFS
Became: Member, NHRC
P C Sharma
Retired from: IPS
Became: Member, NHRC
P K Rastogi
Retired from: IAS, AP
Became: Member, TDSAT
Nirmal Singh
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Chairman, BIFR
Y K Gaiha
Retired from: IRS
Became: Member, BIFR
Saroj Bala
Retired from: IRS
Became: Member, BIFR
Ashok Chawla
Retired from: IAS, Gujarat
Became: Chairman, Competition Commission of India
H C Gupta
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member, Competition Commission of India
Anurag Goel
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member, Competition Commission of India
R Prasad
Retired from: IRS
Became: Member, Competition Commission of India
M L Tayal
Retired from: IAS, Haryana
Became: Member, Competition Commission of India
Rahul Khullar
Retired from: IAS, UT
Became: Chairman,
TRAI
Rajinder Pal Singh
Retired from: IAS, AP
Became: Chairman, NHAI
Ajay Shankar
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member Secretary, National Manufacturing Competitive Council
Shailendra Pandey
Retired from: IAAS
Became: Member (Admin), CAT
Veena Chhotray
Retired from: IAS, Bihar
Became: Member (A), CAT
R C Panda
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Member (A), CAT
Sudhir Kumar
Retired from: IAS,
Karnataka
Became: Member (A), CAT
D C Lakha
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member (A), CAT
Jayati Chandra
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member (A), CAT
R C Joshi
Retired from: IAS,
Maharashtra
Became: Member (A), CAT
Shankar Prasad
Retired from: IAS, Bihar
Became: Member (A), CAT
Champak Chatterjee
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Member (A), CAT
R Bandopadhyaya
Retired from: IAS, W Bengal
Became: Member (A), CAT
Khushiram
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Member (A), CAT
Promila Issar
Retired from: IAS, Haryana
Became: Member (A), CAT
R Satapathy
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Member (A), CAT
K George Joseph
Retired from: IAS, Gujarat
Became: Member (A), CAT
Ranbir Singh
Retired from: IAS, MP
Became: Member (A), CAT
R Sanatanam
Retired from: IAS, Tamil Nadu
Became: Member (A), CAT
Anil Kumar
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Member (A), CAT
Rita Menon
Retired from: IAS, UP
Became: Chairman, ITPO
Rahul Sarin
Retired from:
IAS, Jharkhand
Became: Member,
Competition Appellate Tribunal
T K A Nair
Retired from: IAS, Punjab
Became: Principal Secretary to PM, then named adviser to PM
Shiv Shankar Menon
Retired from: IFS
Became: National Security Adviser
Christy Leon Fernandez
Retired from: IAS, Gujarat
Became: Secretary, President's Secretariat
(Posts as on June 30)
 
 
 
 




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